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Today's Stichomancy for Cindy Crawford

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Emerald City of Oz by L. Frank Baum:

country to city life.

Altogether there were more than half a million people in the Land of Oz--although some of them, as you will soon learn, were not made of flesh and blood as we are--and every inhabitant of that favored country was happy and prosperous.

No disease of any sort was ever known among the Ozites, and so no one ever died unless he met with an accident that prevented him from living. This happened very seldom, indeed. There were no poor people in the Land of Oz, because there was no such thing as money, and all property of every sort belonged to the Ruler. The people were her children, and she cared for them. Each person was given freely by his


The Emerald City of Oz
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Somebody's Little Girl by Martha Young:

The little girl did not laugh at all. She was trying so carefully to put the last rock on top of the stone chimney, she said: ``No, Bessie Bell: some are Mamas, and some are only just Ladies.''

There. There it was again: Only-Just-Ladies.

Bessie Bell wondered how to tell which were Mamas, and which were Ladies--just Ladies.

Very often after that day she watched those who passed the cabin where she and Sister Helen Vincula lived, and wondered which were Mamas--

And which were Ladies.

There was no rule of old or young by which Bessie Bell could tell.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe:

company but in the family when I lodged, and with the clergyman's lady at next door; so that when he was absent I visited nobody, nor did he every find me out of my chamber or parlour whenever he came down; if I went anywhere to take the air, it was always with him.

The living in this manner with him, and his with me, was certainly the most undesigned thing in the world; he often protested to me, that when he became first acquainted with me, and even to the very night when we first broke in upon our rules, he never had the least design of lying with me; that he always had a sincere affection for me, but not the least real


Moll Flanders