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Today's Stichomancy for Faith Hill

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Passion in the Desert by Honore de Balzac:

glittered in the sun like jewelry. It gave him pleasure to contemplate the supple, fine outlines of her form, the whiteness of her belly, the graceful pose of her head. But it was especially when she was playing that he felt most pleasure in looking at her; the agility and youthful lightness of her movements were a continual surprise to him; he wondered at the supple way in which she jumped and climbed, washed herself and arranged her fur, crouched down and prepared to spring. However rapid her spring might be, however slippery the stone she was on, she would always stop short at the word "Mignonne."

One day, in a bright midday sun, an enormous bird coursed through the air. The man left his panther to look at his new guest; but after

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne:

The torrent of men, armed with loaded canes and sticks, was irresistible. Phileas Fogg and Fix were roughly hustled in their attempts to protect their fair companion; the former, as cool as ever, tried to defend himself with the weapons which nature has placed at the end of every Englishman's arm, but in vain. A big brawny fellow with a red beard, flushed face, and broad shoulders, who seemed to be the chief of the band, raised his clenched fist to strike Mr. Fogg, whom he would have given a crushing blow, had not Fix rushed in and received it in his stead. An enormous bruise immediately made its appearance under the detective's silk hat, which was completely smashed in.

"Yankee!" exclaimed Mr. Fogg, darting a contemptuous look at the ruffian.


Around the World in 80 Days
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Sportsman by Xenophon:

nothing else. The plan of making collar and leash all in one is a clumsy contrivance for keeping a hound in check.[3] The surcingle should be broad in the thongs so as not to gall the hound's flanks, and with spurs stitched on to the leather, to preserve the purity of the breed.[4]

[1] {stelmoniai}, al. {telamonias}, broad belts or girths, corselets. Pollux, v. 55.

[2] Pollux, v. 56.

[3] Lit. "since those who make the collar out of the leash do not keep hold (al. take care) of their hounds well."

[4] See "A Day with Xenophon's Harriers," "Macmillan's Mag." Jan.