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Today's Stichomancy for Kurt Vonnegut

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle:

to time I heard some vague account of his doings: of his summons to Odessa in the case of the Trepoff murder, of his clearing up of the singular tragedy of the Atkinson brothers at Trincomalee, and finally of the mission which he had accomplished so delicately and successfully for the reigning family of Holland. Beyond these signs of his activity, however, which I merely shared with all the readers of the daily press, I knew little of my former friend and companion.

One night--it was on the twentieth of March, 1888--I was returning from a journey to a patient (for I had now returned to civil practice), when my way led me through Baker Street. As I


The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Market-Place by Harold Frederic:

didn't dawn on me myself until toward evening Tuesday. But yesterday, of course, I could have told you--and again this afternoon--but, as I say, I couldn't make up my mind. Once I had it on the tip of my tongue--but somehow I didn't. And you--you never gave me a hint that you saw what was going on."

Again Lord Plowden smiled. "I voted with you," he put in softly.

Thorpe laughed, and relit his cigar. "Well, I couldn't have asked anything better than this, "he declared once again. "It beats all the rest put together, to my mind."


The Market-Place
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Bride of Lammermoor by Walter Scott:

. . . Where we must leave her till the resurrection. 'Tis then the Saints enjoy their full perfection.

Mr. Symson also poured forth his elegiac strains upon the fate of the widowed bridegroom, on which subject, after a long and querulous effusion, the poet arrives at the sound conclusion, that if Baldoon had walked on foot, which it seems was his general custom, he would have escaped perishing by a fall from horseback. As the work in which it occurs is so scarce as almost to be unique, and as it gives us the most full account of one of the actors in this tragic tale which we have rehearsed, we will,


The Bride of Lammermoor