Tarot Runes I Ching Stichomancy Contact
Store Numerology Coin Flip Yes or No Webmasters
Personal Celebrity Biorhythms Bibliomancy Settings

Today's Stichomancy for Ridley Scott

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Sentimental Journey by Laurence Sterne:

and taking hold of the flap of his right side pocket with his left hand, he began to search for the letter with his right; - then contrariwise. - DIABLE! then sought every pocket - pocket by pocket, round, not forgetting his fob: - PESTE! - then La Fleur emptied them upon the floor, - pulled out a dirty cravat, - a handkerchief, - a comb, - a whip lash, - a nightcap, - then gave a peep into his hat, - QUELLE ETOURDERIE! He had left the letter upon the table in the auberge; - he would run for it, and be back with it in three minutes.

I had just finished my supper when La Fleur came in to give me an account of his adventure: he told the whole story simply as it was:

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from The Country Doctor by Honore de Balzac:

"No, sir."

"Come! go in-doors and get into bed."

The young invalid went back into the cottage, followed by Benassis and the officer.

"Just light a candle, Captain Bluteau," said the doctor, who was helping Jacques to take off his rough, tattered clothing.

When Genestas had struck a light, and the interior of the room was visible, he was surprised by the extreme thinness of the child, who seemed to be little more than skin and bone. When the little peasant had been put to bed, Benassis tapped the lad's chest, and listened to the ominous sounds made in this way by his fingers; then, after some

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Off on a Comet by Jules Verne:

were Servadac's ears besieged with descriptions of the unparalleled beauties and advantages of this eighteenth arrondissement of Paris, that he could scarcely hear the name of Montmartre without a conscious thrill of aversion. Ben Zoof, however, did not despair of ultimately converting the captain, and meanwhile had resolved never to leave him. When a private in the 8th Cavalry, he had been on the point of quitting the army at twenty-eight years of age, but unexpectedly he had been appointed orderly to Captain Servadac. Side by side they fought in two campaigns. Servadac had saved Ben Zoof's life in Japan; Ben Zoof had rendered his master a like service in the Soudan. The bond of union thus effected could never be severed; and although Ben Zoof's achievements