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Today's Stichomancy for Adam Sandler

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from King Henry VI by William Shakespeare:

GLOSTER. Say'st thou me so? What colour is this cloak of?

SIMPCOX. Red, master, red as blood.

GLOSTER. Why, that's well said. What colour is my gown of?

SIMPCOX. Black, forsooth, coal-black as jet.

KING. Why, then, thou know'st what colour jet is of?

SUFFOLK.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen:

a church tower. The iron railings look just like the door to an old family vault, and then they have brass tops--that's so stupid!"

On the other side of the street were also new and neat houses, and they thought just as the others did; but at the window opposite the old house there sat a little boy with fresh rosy cheeks and bright beaming eyes: he certainly liked the old house best, and that both in sunshine and moonshine. And when he looked across at the wall where the mortar had fallen out, he could sit and find out there the strangest figures imaginable; exactly as the street had appeared before, with steps, projecting windows, and pointed gables; he could see soldiers with halberds, and spouts where the water ran, like dragons and serpents. That was a house to look at; and there lived an old man, who wore


Fairy Tales
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The New Machiavelli by H. G. Wells:

extremely surprising and unwelcome.

Britten and I had wanted to write. We had indeed figured our project modestly as a manuscript magazine of satirical, liberal and brilliant literature by which in some rather inexplicable way the vague tumult of ideas that teemed within us was to find form and expression; Cossington, it was manifest from the outset, wanted neither to write nor writing, but a magazine. I remember the inaugural meeting in Shoesmith major's study--we had had great trouble in getting it together--and how effectually Cossington bolted with the proposal.

"I think we fellows ought to run a magazine," said Cossington. "The