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Today's Stichomancy for Britney Spears

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Reason Discourse by Rene Descartes:

that they have none at all: for we see that very little is required to enable a person to speak; and since a certain inequality of capacity is observable among animals of the same species, as well as among men, and since some are more capable of being instructed than others, it is incredible that the most perfect ape or parrot of its species, should not in this be equal to the most stupid infant of its kind or at least to one that was crack-brained, unless the soul of brutes were of a nature wholly different from ours. And we ought not to confound speech with the natural movements which indicate the passions, and can be imitated by machines as well as manifested by animals; nor must it be thought with certain of the ancients, that the brutes speak, although we do not understand their


Reason Discourse
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from King James Bible:

to pass, when the devil was gone out, the dumb spake; and the people wondered.

LUK 11:15 But some of them said, He casteth out devils through Beelzebub the chief of the devils.

LUK 11:16 And others, tempting him, sought of him a sign from heaven.

LUK 11:17 But he, knowing their thoughts, said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and a house divided against a house falleth.

LUK 11:18 If Satan also be divided against himself, how shall his kingdom stand? because ye say that I cast out devils through Beelzebub.

LUK 11:19 And if I by Beelzebub cast out devils, by whom do your sons


King James Bible
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Apology by Xenophon:

Schmitz, "On the Apology of Socrates, commonly attributed to Xenophon," "Class. Mus." v. 222 foll.; G. Sauppe, "Praef." vol. iii. p. 117, ed. ster.; J. J. Hartman, "An. Xen." p. 111 foll.; E. Richter, "Xen. Stud." pp. 61-96; M. Schanz, "Platos Apologia."

[2] Or possibly, "his deliberate behaviour."

[3] Or, "have succeeded in hitting off"; "done full justice to."

[4] Or, "the magniloquence of the master."

[5] Or, "so that according to them his lofty speech seems rather foolhardy."

[6] See "Mem." IV. viii. 4 foll.), a passage of which this is either an "ebauchement" or a "rechauffe."


The Apology