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Today's Stichomancy for Celine Dion

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Lady Susan by Jane Austen:

and her mother ought to remember it. Mr. Vernon set off for London as soon as she had determined what should be done. He is, if possible, to prevail on Miss Summers to let Frederica continue with her; and if he cannot succeed, to bring her to Churchhill for the present, till some other situation can be found for her. Her ladyship is comforting herself meanwhile by strolling along the shrubbery with Reginald, calling forth all his tender feelings, I suppose, on this distressing occasion. She has been talking a great deal about it to me. She talks vastly well; I am afraid of being ungenerous, or I should say, TOO well to feel so very deeply; but I will not look for her faults; she may be Reginald's wife! Heaven forbid it! but why should I be quicker-sighted than anyone else? Mr. Vernon declares


Lady Susan
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Cromwell by William Shakespeare:

They shall be welcome, husband; I'll go before.-- But is not that man master Friskiball?

[She runs and embraces him.]

BANISTER. O heavens, it is kind master Friskiball! Say sir, what hap hath brought you to this pass?

FRISKIBALL. The same that brought you to your misery.

BANISTER. Why would you not acquaint me with your state? Is Banister your poor friend quite forgot:

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle:

them. The centre door was closed, and across the outside of it had been fastened one of the broad bars of an iron bed, padlocked at one end to a ring in the wall, and fastened at the other with stout cord. The door itself was locked as well, and the key was not there. This barricaded door corresponded clearly with the shuttered window outside, and yet I could see by the glimmer from beneath it that the room was not in darkness. Evidently there was a skylight which let in light from above. As I stood in the passage gazing at the sinister door and wondering what secret it might veil, I suddenly heard the sound of steps within the room and saw a shadow pass backward and forward against the little


The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes