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Today's Stichomancy for James Brown

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Shadow out of Time by H. P. Lovecraft:

of -" Nathaniel Wingate Peaslee had come back - a spirit in whose time scale it was still Thursday morning in 1908, with the economics class gazing up at the battered desk on the platform.

II My reabsorption into normal life was a painful and difficult process. The loss of over five years creates more complications than can be imagined, and in my case there were countless matters to be adjusted. What I heard of my actions since 1908 astonished and disturbed me, but I tried to view the matter as philosophically


Shadow out of Time
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Off on a Comet by Jules Verne:

mysterious document, there were no means of judging; the extent of diminution in the apparent disc of the sun did not afford sufficient basis even for an approximate calculation; and Captain Servadac was perpetually regretting that they could receive no further tidings from the anonymous correspondent, whom he persisted in regarding as a fellow-countryman.

The solidity of the ice was perfect; the utter stillness of the air at the time when the final congelation of the waters had taken place had resulted in the formation of a surface that for smoothness would rival a skating-rink; without a crack or flaw it extended far beyond the range of vision.

The contrast to the ordinary aspect of polar seas was very remarkable.

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll:

butter.

`Were you happy in prison, dear child?' said Haigha.

Hatta looked round once more, and this time a tear or two trickled down his cheek: but not a word would he say.

`Speak, can't you!' Haigha cried impatiently. But Hatta only munched away, and drank some more tea.

`Speak, won't you!' cried the King. 'How are they getting on with the fight?'

Hatta made a desperate effort, and swallowed a large piece of bread-and-butter. `They're getting on very well,' he said in a choking voice: `each of them has been down about eighty-seven


Through the Looking-Glass