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Today's Stichomancy for Jane Seymour

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift:

alive, or otherwise by their nearest relations. But with due deference to so excellent a friend, and so deserving a patriot, I cannot be altogether in his sentiments; for as to the males, my American acquaintance assured me from frequent experience, that their flesh was generally tough and lean, like that of our school-boys, by continual exercise, and their taste disagreeable, and to fatten them would not answer the charge. Then as to the females, it would, I think, with humble submission, be a loss to the publick, because they soon would become breeders themselves: And besides, it is not improbable that some scrupulous people might be apt to censure such a practice, (although indeed very


A Modest Proposal
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne:

I should have no interest in seeing you again; I could place you upon the deck of this vessel which has served you as a refuge, I could sink beneath the waters, and forget that you had ever existed. Would not that be my right?"

"It might be the right of a savage," I answered, "but not that of a civilised man."

"Professor," replied the commander, quickly, "I am not what you call a civilised man! I have done with society entirely, for reasons which I alone have the right of appreciating. I do not, therefore, obey its laws, and I desire you never to allude to them before me again!"


20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Poems by Bronte Sisters:

Some words she now, in murmurs, said; And trickling through her fingers white, Some tears of misery she shed.

"God help me in my grievous need, God help me in my inward pain; Which cannot ask for pity's meed, Which has no licence to complain,

"Which must be borne; yet who can bear, Hours long, days long, a constant weight-- The yoke of absolute despair, A suffering wholly desolate?