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Today's Stichomancy for Jay Leno

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Silverado Squatters by Robert Louis Stevenson:

beds made, the plates on the rack, the pail of bright water behind the door, the stove crackling in a corner, and perhaps the table roughly laid against a meal, - and man's order, the little clean spots that he creates to dwell in, were at once contrasted with the rich passivity of nature. And yet our house was everywhere so wrecked and shattered, the air came and went so freely, the sun found so many portholes, the golden outdoor glow shone in so many open chinks, that we enjoyed, at the same time, some of the comforts of a roof and much of the gaiety and brightness of al fresco life. A single shower of rain, to be sure, and we should have been

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Reminiscences of Tolstoy by Leo Tolstoy:

and whether Dmitry Rostóf was such and such a person and Levin such and such another, he never gave a definite answer, and one could not but feel that he disliked such questions and was rather offended by them. In those remote days about which I am talking, my father was very keen about the management of his estate, and devoted a lot of energy to it. I can remember his planting the huge apple orchard at Yásnaya and several hundred acres of birch and pine forest, and at the beginning of the seventies, for a number of years, he was interested in buying up land cheap in the province of Samara, and breeding droves of steppe horses and

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Sons of the Soil by Honore de Balzac:

wanderers the way to find the tilbury. When they reached the gate Madame Michaud called, "Prince!"

"Prince! Prince!" called the bailiff; then he whistled,--but no greyhound.

Emile mentioned the curious noise that began their adventure.

"My wife heard that noise," said Michaud, "and I laughed at her."

"They have killed Prince!" exclaimed the countess. "I am sure of it; they killed him by cutting his throat at one blow. What I heard was the groan of a dying animal."

"The devil!" cried Michaud; "the matter must be cleared up."

Emile and the bailiff left the two ladies with Joseph and the horses,