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Today's Stichomancy for John Travolta

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Adventure by Jack London:

Tulagi were laughing about it. I was a fool, and I certainly made the mistake of taking the situation on its assumed innocent face- value."

So angry was Sheldon becoming that the face and form of the other seemed to vibrate and oscillate before his eyes. Yet outwardly Sheldon was calm and apparently weary of the discussion.

"Please keep her out of the conversation," he said.

"But why should I?" was the demand. "The pair of you trapped me into making a fool of myself. How was I to know that everything was not all right? You and she acted as if everything were on the square. But my eyes are open now. Why, she played the outraged

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from King James Bible:

head;

KI1 2:45 And king Solomon shall be blessed, and the throne of David shall be established before the LORD for ever.

KI1 2:46 So the king commanded Benaiah the son of Jehoiada; which went out, and fell upon him, that he died. And the kingdom was established in the hand of Solomon.

KI1 3:1 And Solomon made affinity with Pharaoh king of Egypt, and took Pharaoh's daughter, and brought her into the city of David, until he had made an end of building his own house, and the house of the LORD, and the wall of Jerusalem round about.

KI1 3:2 Only the people sacrificed in high places, because there was no


King James Bible
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Father Damien by Robert Louis Stevenson:

is an ordeal from which the nerves of a man's spirit shrink, even as his eye quails under the brightness of the sun; you would have felt it was (even today) a pitiful place to visit and a hell to dwell in. It is not the fear of possible infection. That seems a little thing when compared with the pain, the pity, and the disgust of the visitor's surroundings, and the atmosphere of affliction, disease, and physical disgrace in which he breathes. I do not think I am a man more than usually timid; but I never recall the days and nights I spent upon that island promontory (eight days and seven nights), without heartfelt thankfulness that I am somewhere else. I find in my diary that I speak of my stay as a "grinding