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Today's Stichomancy for Jon Stewart

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling:

dead wolves? This is no good hunting."

"It is my Word which I have spoken. The Trees know, the River knows. Till the dhole have gone by my Word comes not back to me."

"Ngssh! This changes all trails. I had thought to take thee away with me to the northern marshes, but the Word--even the Word of a little, naked, hairless Manling--is the Word. Now I, Kaa, say----"

"Think well, Flathead, lest thou tie thyself into the death-knot also. I need no Word from thee, for well I know----"

"Be it so, then," said Kaa. "I will give no Word; but what is in


The Second Jungle Book
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Walden by Henry David Thoreau:

for a quarter of a dollar, and a winter cap for sixty-two and a half cents, or a better be made at home at a nominal cost, where is he so poor that, clad in such a suit, of his own earning, there will not be found wise men to do him reverence? When I ask for a garment of a particular form, my tailoress tells me gravely, "They do not make them so now," not emphasizing the "They" at all, as if she quoted an authority as impersonal as the Fates, and I find it difficult to get made what I want, simply because she cannot believe that I mean what I say, that I am so rash. When I hear this oracular sentence, I am for a moment absorbed in thought, emphasizing to myself each word separately that


Walden
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The Republic by Plato:

in the works of Dr. Johnson of any acquaintance with his writings. He probably would have refuted Plato without reading him, in the same fashion in which he supposed himself to have refuted Bishop Berkeley's theory of the non-existence of matter. If we except the so-called English Platonists, or rather Neo-Platonists, who never understood their master, and the writings of Coleridge, who was to some extent a kindred spirit, Plato has left no permanent impression on English literature.

7. Human life and conduct are affected by ideals in the same way that they are affected by the examples of eminent men. Neither the one nor the other are immediately applicable to practice, but there is a virtue flowing from them which tends to raise individuals above the common routine of society


The Republic