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Today's Stichomancy for Moby

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from King James Bible:

have made their groves, provoking the LORD to anger.

KI1 14:16 And he shall give Israel up because of the sins of Jeroboam, who did sin, and who made Israel to sin.

KI1 14:17 And Jeroboam's wife arose, and departed, and came to Tirzah: and when she came to the threshold of the door, the child died;

KI1 14:18 And they buried him; and all Israel mourned for him, according to the word of the LORD, which he spake by the hand of his servant Ahijah the prophet.

KI1 14:19 And the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, how he warred, and how he reigned, behold, they are written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel.


King James Bible
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Montezuma's Daughter by H. Rider Haggard:

us.

'Who is that great lady?' I asked of Guatemoc.

'That is my cousin Otomie, the princess of the Otomie, my uncle Montezuma's favourite daughter,' he answered. 'She likes you, Teule, and that is well for you for many reasons. Hush!'

As he spoke the screen at the far end of the chamber was drawn aside. Beyond it a man sat upon a broidered cushion, who was inhaling the fumes of the tobacco weed from a gilded pipe of wood after the Indian fashion. This man, who was no other than the monarch Montezuma, was of a tall build and melancholy countenance, having a very pale face for one of his nation, and thin black hair.


Montezuma's Daughter
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from Faraday as a Discoverer by John Tyndall:

the opinion of Mr. Carlyle, that 'a really able man never proceeded from entirely stupid parents'--I once used the privilege of my intimacy with Mr. Faraday to ask him whether his parents showed any signs of unusual ability. He could remember none. His father, I believe, was a great sufferer during the latter years of his life, and this might have masked whatever intellectual power he possessed. When thirteen years old, that is to say in 1804, Faraday was apprenticed to a bookseller and bookbinder in Blandford Street, Manchester Square: here he spent eight years of his life, after which he worked as a journeyman elsewhere.

You have also heard the account of Faraday's first contact with the