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Today's Stichomancy for Natalie Portman

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from Poems of William Blake by William Blake:

And none to answer, none to cherish thee with mothers smiles.

The Clod of Clay heard the Worms voice & rais'd her pitying head: She bowd over the weeping infant, and her life exhald In milky fondness, then on Thel she fix'd her humble eyes

O beauty of the vales of Har, we live not for ourselves, Thou seest me the meanest thing, and so I am indeed: My bosom of itself is cold, and of itself is dark,

But he that loves the lowly, pours his oil upon my head And kisses me, and binds his nuptial bands around my breast. And says; Thou mother of my children, I have loved thee And I have given thee a crown that none can take away.


Poems of William Blake
The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen:

"She must not go, she must allow him five minutes longer," and he took her hand and led her back to her seat, and was in the middle of his farther explanation, before she had suspected for what she was detained. When she did understand it, however, and found herself expected to believe that she had created sensations which his heart had never known before, and that everything he had done for William was to be placed to the account of his excessive and unequalled attachment to her, she was exceedingly distressed, and for some moments unable to speak. She considered it all as nonsense,


Mansfield Park
The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from The New Machiavelli by H. G. Wells:

the way to Grantchester.

I can still see Margaret as I saw her that afternoon, see her fresh fair face, with the little obliquity of the upper lip, and her brow always slightly knitted, and her manner as of one breathlessly shy but determined. She had rather open blue eyes, and she spoke in an even musical voice with the gentlest of stresses and the ghost of a lisp. And it was true, she gathered, that Cambridge still existed. "I went to Grantchester," she said, "last year, and had tea under the apple-blossom. I didn't think then I should have to come down." (It was that started the curate upon his anecdote.)

"I've seen a lot of pictures, and learnt a lot about them--at the