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Today's Stichomancy for Paris Hilton

The first excerpt represents the past or something you must release, and is drawn from The Golden Threshold by Sarojini Naidu:

Henceforward dream, because thou wilt not stay, Backward to transient pleasure and to thee?

I give thee back thy false, ephemeral vow; But, O beloved comrade, ere we part, Upon my mournful eyelids and my brow Kiss me who hold thine image in my heart.

NIGHTFALL IN THE CITY OF HYDERABAD

See how the speckled sky burns like a pigeon's throat, Jewelled with embers of opal and peridote.

See the white river that flashes and scintillates, Curved like a tusk from the mouth of the city-gates.

The second excerpt represents the present or the deciding factor of the moment, and is drawn from Off on a Comet by Jules Verne:

the little creek where the _Dobryna_ and the _Hansa_ lay firmly imprisoned in their icy bonds.

The temperature was low beyond previous experience; but well muffled up in fur, they all endured it without much actual suffering. Their breath issued in vapor, which was at once congealed into little crystals upon their whiskers, beards, eyebrows, and eyelashes, until their faces, covered with countless snow-white prickles, were truly ludicrous. The little professor, most comical of all, resembled nothing so much as the cub of an Arctic bear.

It was eight o'clock in the morning. The sun was rapidly approaching the zenith; but its disc, from the extreme remoteness,

The third excerpt represents the future or something you must embrace, and is drawn from To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf:

had said relentlessly that (and the bill for the greenhouse would be fifty pounds). For that reason, knowing what was before them--love and ambition and being wretched alone in dreary places--she had often the feeling, Why must they grow up and lose it all? And then she said to herself, brandishing her sword at life, Nonsense. They will be perfectly happy. And here she was, she reflected, feeling life rather sinister again, making Minta marry Paul Rayley; because whatever she might feel about her own transaction, she had had experiences which need not happen to every one (she did not name them to herself); she was driven on, too quickly she knew, almost as if it were an escape for her too, to say that people must marry; people must have children.


To the Lighthouse